V&S_4_Reading_In the Blink of An Eye

First of all, as one-shot sceneĀ mentioned in the reading, here’s an one-shot scene I’d love to share, from movie Atonement by Joe Wright. I respect it more after filming by ourselves.

After this project, I find editing is much more easier than filming actually. Just like cooking, without good and fresh materials, you can’t make a cuisine. It helps a lot if you have all the materials you want on hand, thus the things like “in the middle of cooking finding that you don’t have onions at all and you either have to deal with it or just stop cooking and walking out to buy one” won’t happen on you.

There’re two points I find relatively interesting in the reading.

  • Like sleeping therapy, editor helps director to make description more clearly(when things donā€™t go as what director originally think about, director will defend for it then thus become more aware of the theme/thoughts). It’s so true. We’re both the directors and editorsĀ in this class project, and when we started editing, we kind of rethought about the whole concept and became more aware of the shots we missed.
  • Filming and editing are like learning foreign language. You know it well enough but it’s always difficult to speak or even write it. Sometimes you just have to let it go and speak whatever come across your mind, or you’ll be framed by the grammars and then stuck. And this happens in filming/editing as well. A lot of things didn’t follow the script at all. Storyboard and script become a big concept to follow, and improvisation gradually dominates all. But I’m not sure if it’s a good thing, because it seems professional movies and animations follow the script strictly. Some of the final shots look exactly the same with storyboard. That’s probably because they spend a lot of time in the pre-production and sometimes it takes years, so they can make sure what they really want clearly and then be able to follow the script. And maybe it’s also related to the scale. It costs hugely so you don’t have space to waste, and it needs clear descriptions for a lot of staff to follow. And it makes me wonder, is it normal and good to improvise in small scale production? For either filming or editing?

Below is my first editing work, and since it’s a fantasy told by reconstructing clips of movies, it’s relatively simpler than filming and editing at the same time.